Plumbers vs Electricians - Lessons from Stroke Recovery Event as iCalendar

(Seminars)

13 October 2017

3:30 - 4:30pm

Venue: Lecture Theatre 731.201, Tāmaki Innovation Campus

Location: 261 Morrin Road, St Johns, Auckland

Contact email: tamaki-info@auckland.ac.nz

 

Head of Tāmaki Innovation Campus Seminar Series

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Professor Winston Byblow
Professor Winston Byblow

Speaker: Professor Winston Byblow, Department of Exercise Sciences, the University of Auckland

Abstract: In the developed world, the incidence of stroke is increasing while mortality from stroke is decreasing. As a result, more people are left with lingering impairment and permanent disability. Stroke medicine is more about treating the blood and hardly at all about treating the brain. Vascular neurology (plumbers) have made recent important advances for early treatment within hours of stroke, while neurorehabilitation (electricians) fall further behind in their quest for treatment options for the days, weeks, months and years after a stroke.

In this seminar, I’ll describe recent progress and future challenges for both plumbers and electricians, with an Auckland- and sometimes Tamaki-centric view. I’ll explain reasons why some people make a seemingly remarkable recovery of motor function after stroke, while others do not, and the added value of being able to make accurate predictions for individual patients.

 

Profile: Professor Winston Byblow conducts pioneering work in stroke rehabilitation and the brain mechanisms underlying movement control. The Movement Neuroscience Laboratory he established within the Department of Exercise Sciences at the Tāmaki campus is a magnet for international scholars and a central component of the University of Auckland’s Centre for Brain Research. His research is published in the world’s leading journals of Neurology and Neuroscience. He regularly presents original research findings at international conferences, and has co-authored over 150 journal articles. He routinely serves on national and international scientific and grant awarding committees for health-related funding organizations, is an ad-hoc reviewer for several neuroscience journals, and frequently gives public lectures on neuroscience topics as part of International Brain Awareness Week and Neurological Foundation appeal week.  

 

This seminar will be followed by a networking event (4.30-6pm) in the Atrium, Level 2, Building 730.

Map and location of Tāmaki Innovation Campus